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10 Page Essay On The Civil Rights Movement

Civil Rights Movement Essay The most encompassed series of events during the 1950’s and 1960’s was the civil rights movement. A movement which defined how African Americans progressed from being considered second class citizens to a unified demographic who became more endowed to handle the high tensions between them and the white segregationists. Howard Zinn and Alan Brinkley each show the significance of the events during the Civil Rights Movement and the movement as a whole in their respective books A People’s History of the United States and The Unfinished Nation . Each of the authors has different perspectives about how white leaders had responded to the movement and about how the movement was significant in the long run. Zinn and Brinkley also discuss the successes as well as failures that the African Americans experienced during the Civil Rights Movement. Brinkley focuses more on traditionally significant aspects of the movement such as the Brown vs. Board of Education decision, the Montgomery bus boycott, and the Civil Rights Acts. Zinn provides a different perspective, which is more valuable because he writes about the specific injustices brought upon the African Americans and all the struggles they went through. Overall, Zinn is more persuasive in explaining what transpired because unlike Brinkley, Zinn focuses on the racism, inequality, and violence displayed towards the African Americans. According to Brinkley, World War II played a major role in the beginning of the African American protests of the 1950’s and 1960’s. The large number of blacks that served in the military or worked in the war industry saw that they had a greater place in the world than they had been given in previous years. Brinkley states how this new outlook gave them an increased desire for upward mobility in the American society. In addition, the main aspects that Brinkley covers in his analysis of the Civil Rights Movement include the growing urban black middle

Essay about The Civil Rights Movement in the USA

1293 Words6 Pages

The American declaration of independence stated, that: “All men are created equal”. But in the 19th century only whites were born with equal opportunities. Africans were imported as slaves and had to work on the fields of the whites. Until 1865 the Negroes were treated and looked at as something lower than human. They were compared to apes, and therefore just owned the same rights as animals. They were raised believing that whites were superior. It took them years to realize that they have to stand up for their rights. The uprising turned into a brutal civil war.
After the war, the slaves were freed. The thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth amendment of the U.S. constitution prohibited slavery, discrimination and denegation of the right…show more content…

The American declaration of independence stated, that: “All men are created equal”. But in the 19th century only whites were born with equal opportunities. Africans were imported as slaves and had to work on the fields of the whites. Until 1865 the Negroes were treated and looked at as something lower than human. They were compared to apes, and therefore just owned the same rights as animals. They were raised believing that whites were superior. It took them years to realize that they have to stand up for their rights. The uprising turned into a brutal civil war.
After the war, the slaves were freed. The thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth amendment of the U.S. constitution prohibited slavery, discrimination and denegation of the right to vote (Appendix A). The former slaves were promised land and a mule as well as equal opportunities and rights as the whites.
But even though, these laws existed they were still treated unfairly. African Americans had been very poor as slaves and being free didn’t make them rich. Most did not receive their own land, which means that they had to go back to work for whites. Laws were introduced to prevent blacks from voting. They had to pass a literacy test and be able to pay a poll tax. Only if their grandfather had been able to vote, then they could skip the two tests. Barely any Negro was able to fulfill these requirements, and so they remained without the promised right to vote. On top of this, Jim Crow laws were introduced. They

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